Thursday 13 May 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham (note that the location of these has recently changed).

• This week’s Newbury weekly News reports on p28 that Thatcham Town Council recently debated how it would safely and legally conduct its meetings between 7 May (when the dispensation to hold them remotely ended) and 21 June (when the roadmap suggested that it would safe and permitted once again to hold meetings in-person without considerablymhimiting the number of attendees). As the prohibition is only on meetings which reach decisions and vote, it was eventually decided to temporarily turn its committees into working groups whose decisions would then be approved by the Clerk and one other councillor under delegated powers. other councils up and down the country will have been going through similar contortions.

• A letter in the same paper this week pores scorn on the “delightful” claims made about the development at Charlotte close in Hermitage by the western Area Planning committee (see last week’s entry, below0. The writer claims that the village has already been “vastly ever-developed.”

Yattendon may be many people’s idea of an idyllic English village but it’s also the home of the infamous Calvesley pig farm which, as was reported here and elsewhere last year, was the scene of horrifying and systemic acts of animal cruelty. This week’s NWN takes up the story on p5. If it doesn’t make you vegetarian, it certainly makes you want to question your butcher about where the meat comes from and to try buy the stuff from a retailer you trust or from a reputable supplier (easier to do in this part of the country than in a city).

• The most recent meeting of Thatcham Town Council for which minutes are available took place on 29 March and you can red the minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 13 April and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council took place on 6 April and you can download the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 15 April and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: planning applications; financial matters; rights of way; anti-social behaviour in Pinewood Park; playground inspections; tree work; the Village Hall; and the bus shelter.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Council took place on 1 March and you can read the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council (also the annual meeting) took place on 6 May and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: a new councillor; financial matters; and planning applications and decisions.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 12 April and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: the proposed 2,500 homes in Thatcham (more than once); the Bucklebury Playing Field Charity and Bucklebury Recreation Ground Charity; re-arrangement of meetings following the government’s insistence that all meetings must take place in person from 7 May; litter-picking events; a confusion about the Memorial Hall planning application; cleaning the bus shelter; planning applications; improvements at Bucklebury meadows; dog mess (an item that seems to crop up at every meeting in every parish); a possible wildflower meadow at Hockett Field; playground and bike track inspections; litter; CCTV; speeding; recycling; financial matters; future meetings; and the Working group looking at WBC’s local plan, specifically the part of it the proposes that 2,500 homes be built in Thatcham.

Click here for details of Covid lateral flow tests, which are available at four sites across the district (Hungerford, Newbury, Thatcham and Burghfield), and home-testing kits.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with a sunset and ends with Plato.

Thatcham area council news

Parishes: click here for Thatcham Town CouncilHermitage Parish CouncilCold Ash Parish CouncilMidgham Parish CouncilBucklebury Parish CouncilBrimpton Parish CouncilStanford Dingley Parish Council and Woolhampton Parish Council.

West Berkshire Council: click here to visit the website.

News from other areas

Penny Post area – please see the following separate sections: Hungerford area; Lambourn Valley; Marlborough area; Newbury area; Compton and Downlands; Theale area; Wantage area; Swindon area.

News and views from across the area and beyond: please see the most recent Weekly News with Brian column.

Thursday 6 May 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham (note that the location of these has recently changed).

• I referred last week to the proposals to redraw Thatcham’s settlement boundary in order to include the proposed 2,500 homes that WBC announced earlier this year in its emerging local plan and Thatcham TC’s reasons for objecting to this (mainly because the location of the country park needed to be established so that the settlement boundary excluded this). There’s a letter from a Lib Der Councillor on Thatcham TC which explains Thatcham’s concerns in greater detail.

• Also in this week’s NWN, on p26, is an article about what WBC’s executive member for culture, Howard Woollaston, described as “blue-sky thinking”, about the idea that the upgrading of Thatcham Library (which all agree is needed) could, rather than being done piecemeal, take advantage of the impending demolition of the Walnut Close Care Home which abuts both the Library and the medical practice next door, so allowing space for both to expand. This is likely to be a long-term plan although Thatcham TC is proposing that some things need attending to more urgently. I spoke to Paul James, WBC’s Library services Manager, who confirmed that they were trying to balance these short- and long-term objectives. He agreed that “accessible” (not “disabled”, as the article mentioned) toilets were needed and that he was looking into what the options were for this that would avoid the risk that they would need to be torn down in a few years if the larger project took shape. He said that a feasibility report was being prepared which should be ready in about a month.

• I don’t think you often get members of a planning committee outbidding each other with their praise for a new housing development but that’s what happened at Western Area last week with the plans for Charlotte Close in Hermitage (which had been called in as more than 10 people objected). The report on p27 of this week’s NWN quotes Councillor Hilary Cole as praising the “careful consideration” that has gone into the design, while Councillor Tony Vickers described it as “really well thought-through.” Councillor Cole also added that “it’s pleasing to see that we’re getting 40% affordable housing.” Indeed: as this is WBC’s policy for a greenfield site, one would imagine she wouldn’t need to say this, any more than she might praise the fact that the houses had roofs. That it did need to be said shows how often this policy is breached by developers, for whom such a stipulation is unprofitable.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 13 April and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council took place on 6 April and you can download the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 March and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Council took place on 1 March and you can read the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 12 April and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: the proposed 2,500 homes in Thatcham (more than once); the Bucklebury Playing Field Charity and Bucklebury Recreation Ground Charity; re-arrangement of meetings following the government’s insistence that all meetings must take place in person from 7 May; litter-picking events; a confusion about the Memorial Hall planning application; cleaning the bus shelter; planning applications; improvements at Bucklebury meadows; dog mess (an item that seems to crop up at every meeting in every parish); a possible wildflower meadow at Hockett Field; playground and bike track inspections; litter; CCTV; speeding; recycling; financial matters; and future meetings. Hats off also to the Clerk, Helen Pratt, who has produced a very comprehensive set of minutes that go beyond being just a bald formal record.

• One item in the above-mentioned minutes deserves quoting in full. Item P9 concerned the update from the Working Group on WBC’s local plan (which proposes that 2,500 homes be built between Thatcham and Bucklebury). “The article written for The Oaks [the village magazine] has now been published on the website and on Facebook. Links to it have been shared on Twitter and Instagram. A meeting is to be held with Thatcham Town Council and surrounding parishes to consider working together. Representatives of the Working Group are meeting with the developer putting forwards the Colthrop Village proposal. A number of parishioners are assisting with work including Julian Dobbins (Environment) and Jason Allum (Flooding). Areas being researched include crematoria and pollution. Traffic is still being considered; questions were asked about whether there could be access to the WB traffic modelling information. It has also been identified that the CIL benefits from the Colthrop Village development are far higher than from the NE Thatcham development. Discussions are ongoing with Mike Robinson, the Planning Consultant.”

(The “surrounding parishes” refer to Cold Ash and Midgham, as well as Bucklebury and Thatcham. The plan is that these pool resources and expertise and collectively instruct planning consultants and legal advisors to oppose the proposals as they stand.)

Click here for details of Covid lateral flow tests, which are available at four sites across the district (Hungerford, Newbury, Thatcham and Burghfield), and home-testing kits.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with birds and bees and ends with Chuck Palahniuk.

Thursday 29 April 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham (note that the location of these has recently changed).

• There’s an article on p27 of this week’s NWN about the proposals to redraw Thatcham’s settlement boundary in order to include the proposed 2,500 homes that WBC announced earlier this year in its emerging local plan. I found this slightly hard to follow. A couple of calls and emails have revealed that it seems WBC asked Thatcham Town Council to consult on this, but the town immediately raised a problem. A settlement boundary is, according Plainview, “normally a line drawn around a settlement in the proposals map of a local plan. The local plan generally allows for development within the boundary and resists development outside.” The issue Thatcham had was that a country park is planned for the site: as its location has not been specified, the new settlement boundary could not ring-fence this to protect it from future development. WBC pointed out that it was “incorrect” to suggest that just because a site is within a settlement boundary it will inevitably be developed. That may be so, but the predisposition will be in favour. Such projects can take a long time to reach fruition: plans can change and “auld acquaintance be forgot”. WBC is then quoted as saying that “only once the development has been defined that the settlement boundary can be definitively changed,” which leaves me wondering why the question is being asked of Thatcham TC now. One might also expect the neighbouring parishes of Bucklebury, Midgham and Cold Ash to be consulted with at the same time but it seems this hasn’t happened. I’m not quite sure what the next move is on this.

• All four parishes are opposed to the 2,500-home development as it stands and are discussing what their joint response will be. As mentioned previously, this may take the form of an over-arching group to co-ordinate this and to obtain the expert planning and legal advice that will be required. More on this in due course.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 13 April and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: a discussion about the record of a planning application considered at the previous meeting; no parking under the basketball hoop; the future of the goats on the grazing field; planning matters; the bridge at the wildlife allotment garden; a proposed sympathetic pollard for the twin-trunked oak tree; financial matters; funding for the traffic consultant; the annual parish meeting (on 5 May); reports from the committees; and correspondence received “regarding rifle use.”

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council took place on 6 April and you can download the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 March and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Council took place on 1 March and you can read the draft minutes here. One item from this that caught my eye was that WBC doesn’t have a policy on whether passing places in narrow roads – in which the area abounds – which are often churned up by cars pulling in to let other vehicles pass. This seems a particular problem in this parish but it would by no means be unique to it.

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 8 March and you can read the minutes here.

• There was also an extraordinary Bucklebury PC meeting on 19 March, the sole purpose of which was to set up an opposition group to the plan to build 2,500 homes to the north east of Thatcham and on the edge of Bucklebury. You can read he minutes here.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with girl-guiding and ends with the diary of a girl.

Thursday 22 April 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham.

• A letter in today’s NWN accuses WBC’s Planning Policy Manager Bryan Lyttle of spouting “incomprehensible gobbledegook” by suggesting that a bridge at Thatcham would become a rat run and increase traffic flows in the area. I must leap to his defence: the point he made seems clear enough to me and is, presumably, based on evidence from elsewhere. I’m not sure I agree with it, as the writer certainly doesn’t; but that’s a separate matter. His point was being made with regard to WBC’s current plan to build 2,500 homes to the north east of the town. If the 950 south of the tracks at Colthrop gets off the ground then a bridge would probably be necessary if the queues at the level crossing are not to get out of control. I suppose there’s a risk that all the developer contributions would go towards any bridge, so leaving nothing to support the other infrastructure improvements that everyone agrees are long overdue in the town. Elsewhere in the letters page, another reader suggests a tunnel. This would lead to exactly the same result, for good or for ill, and would probably be more expensive. Actually, I don’t know why I said that. Are bridges more expensive than tunnels? Anyone know the answer to that one?

• On p24, this week’s NWN reports on the approval by WBC of plans to “improve and repair” the old Bluecoat School building in Thatcham.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council took place on 6 April and you can download the draft minutes here. Items covered included: permitted footpaths; a proposed “no cold-calling zone”; the possible purchase of a speed indicator device; road safety; a possible cash machine in the village (not being pursued as there’s no suitable site); planning issues; the proposed solar farm at Riddings Farm; the ongoing complaint about the planning decision at Washoe Lodge; financial matters; a councillor resignation; and the next meeting (4 May) which will be attended by Laura Farris.

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 March and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: the replacement of the bus shelter; planning applications; financial matters; confirmation on the guidance on the use of artificial flowers at the burial ground (silk flowers are now acceptable); playground inspections; the Hermitage Support Group (which has been given an award by the sheriff of Berkshire); progress on the transfer of hermitage Green to the PC; and the date of the annual parish assembly (Thursday 29 April, online.)

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 23 March and you can read the minutes here.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 8 March and you can read the minutes here.

• There was also an extraordinary Bucklebury PC meeting on 19 March, the sole purpose of which was to set up an opposition group to the plan to build 2,500 homes to the north east of Thatcham and on the edge of Bucklebury. You can read he minutes here.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Councillor for which minutes are available took place on 18 January and you can read the draft minutes here.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with a sapling and ends with Samuel West.

Thursday 15 April 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham.

• All the discussion about the proposed 2,500 homes in Thatcham has seemingly miffed the proposers of a 950-home development at Colthrop, just south of the railway lines. One advantage this has over the larger plan is that it would be within walking distance of Thatcham’s awkwardly-sited station, so immediately making it more sustainable. It would also certainly require a bridge (off a new roundabout in Piper’s Way). WBC doesn’t seem to like the idea of a bridge for its own north-east Thatcham plan, claiming it would be a rat run. Were 2,000-odd people to move in south of the tracks, however, the level crossing would grind to a complete halt. Perhaps the Council is also concerned that the cost of this (and then some) would use up all the developer contributions, leaving nothing over for the other infrastructure improvements that the town already badly needs. It also might be slightly spooked by the fact that a consortium is involved, rather than a singe developer and landowner, something which has caused and is causing so many problems at Sandleford. The larger north-east Thatcham site will, however, have four separate companies involved on four contiguous but separate sites. The Colthrop scheme certainly seems to be on a more human scale: perhaps more importantly, it’s quite a lot further advanced.

Newbury Today reports that the charity Heartstart Thatcham, which over the last eight years has installed over 60 defrillators across the district and trained over 2,000 people – has decided to close “following the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and other issues.”

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: salt bins; Covid scams; an update on the Village Hall; financial matters; one planning application; the PC’s response to the proposed 2,500-home development in Thatcham; delays to the footpath repairs; the co-option of a new councillor; and confirmation that the 2021 Annual Parish Meeting will take place on 25 May in the Village Hall.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 23 March and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: football on the recreation ground; rolling the cricket square; tree removal; the annual parish meeting (on 5 May); planning applications (in particular 21/00330 for the conversion to agricultural buildings to residential dwellings at Cleardene Farm, concerning which the PC had “many concerns”.

• The same meeting also referred to a possible plan to lobby for the use of the Newbury Showground near M4 J13 for housing, in preference to the sit in NE Thatcham where 2,500 homes have been propose. The meeting was told, however, that this would not be suitable due to pollution levels (a distribution centre would seem to be the preferred option). The report then appeared to go on to the suggest that a similar charge could be levied at the 2,500-home site for being close to the A4.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council for which minutes are available took place on 2 March and you can read the draft minutes here. The most recent meeting took place on 6 April and a video of this is available here (and will probably remain until draft minutes are published).

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 February and you can read the minutes here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 8 March and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: a possible dog-exercise field; the formation of an opposition group to the Thatcham housing plans (see also paragraph below); the PC’s anticipation of the answers to written questions from the Ask Hilary Facebook Live session last month; the change of ownership at Bucklebury Farm park; litter picking on the Common; the latest edition of the quarterly parish magazine The Oaks (which you can read here); one planning application; the settlement boundary; wildflowers at Hockett Field; socially-distanced conversations at Bucklebury meadows; repairs in the cemetery; barriers on the bike track; SID equipment; reports from the committees; financial matters; and the report that the parish has collected 74kg of bottle tops which have been sent for recycling (that’s about 37,000 of the little round, sharp, slightly jagged metal things).

• There was also an extraordinary Bucklebury PC meeting on 19 March, the sole purpose of which was to set up an opposition group to the plan to build 2,500 homes to the north east of Thatcham and on the edge of Bucklebury. You can read he minutes here. The group has been set up and given start-up funding of £1,000 by the PC (after that, I’m told, it’s on its own). The main costs for such groups is expert external consultants and it was felt that the group would in time require £10-15,000 and more if legal counsel were needed at any enquiry. To help produce some economies of scale, the plan is that the councils or opposition groups from the five affected parishes – Thatcham, Bucklebury, Woolhampton, Midgham and Cold Ash – would create one over-arching…may I use the term “super group”? That’s the idea anyway. If you would like to find out more, please contact the respective PC. Once established, this will have its own website and FB page.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Councillor for which minutes are available took place on 18 January and you can read the draft minutes here.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with a grey horse and ends with Dorian Gray.

Thursday 8 April 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham.

• This week’s NWN has on p26 an article which re-opens the debate about wether there should be a bridge or an underpass or something at Thatcham to replace the level crossing. Network Rail has recently claimed that it would support this plan if the proposed 950-home development at Colthrop to the south of the railway line went ahead. The article reports that the rail network still has about 6,000 level crossings, each one of which must cause sleepless night for those responsible for them. This idea is also relevant to the proposed 2,500-home development in north east Thatcham, although opinions differ as to what impact this would have on traffic wanting to cross the tracks and whether, were a bridge to be built, this would be used as a rat run to Greenham and points south.

• An extraordinary story from the Thatcham section of the same paper, a variation of the archetypical “dog bites man” scoop. A woman was savagely attacked by a German shepherd (“Alsatian” they used to be called, the new name being a PR job). A man then appeared with a dog lead, brought the animal to heel, pleaded with the victim not to call the police and then left with the dog. Laster he denied that it was his animal and that he just happened to be passing by with a dog lead (but no dog) and managed to say just the right things to bring the animal to heel (he has an Alsatian of his own). He then claimed that he didn’t care what happened to the dog as it wasn’t his and had left it when it wouldn’t follow him any further. No DNA evidence of the animal was found at his home. The biting dog has since vanished. After a three-day trial, he was acquitted of owning a dangerous animal, the court accepting his counsel’s claim that no one was lying, it was just that some of them mis-heard what he had said. “Don’t go to the police” and “that’s not my dog” don’t sound very similar to me: but, then again, I wasn’t there. I can’t get my round the fact that an Alsatian owner with a lead just happened upon the scene when he was most needed. Mind you, it does happen. For about 10 years I had a BMW. It only broke down on the road twice: and on both occasions the person in the car behind me was a qualified BMW mechanic who fixed the problem.

• On 8 March, Councillor Hilary Cole (portfolio holder for planning) and Bryan Lyttle (Planning Policy Manager) held a Facebook Live update on the proposed West Berkshire Local Plan Review with a particular focus on the North East Thatcham Strategic Site Allocation. You can see a recording of the event here.

• You might also want to click here to read what the main interested parties have to say about the proposed plans in for 2,500 homes in Thatcham.

• The long-running saga of Piggy Woods (which last year was revealed to be owned but by West Berkshire Council but by an investment company which has since been busy parcelling the land up and selling it at auction) last week took a step forward with confirmation that a number of tree preservation orders arranged by Thatcham Town Council are now in force. These should provide a powerful and permanent protection against the risk of speculative development.

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here. items covered included: salt bins; Covid scams; an update on the Village Hall; financial matters; one planning application; the PC’s response to the proposed 2,500-home development in Thatcham; delays to the footpath repairs; the co-option of a new councillor; and confirmation that the 2021 Annual Parish Meeting will take place on 25 May in the Village Hall.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 9 March and you can read the minutes here.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council for which minutes are available took place on 2 March and you can read the draft minutes here. The most recent meeting took place on 6 April and a video of this is available here (and will probably remain until draft minutes are published).

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 February and you can read the minutes here.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 8 February and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Councillor for which minutes are available took place on 18 January and you can read the draft minutes here.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with a graveyard and ends with Einstein.

Thursday 1 April 2021

• See here for details of the Covid lateral flow tests that are available in Thatcham.

• Thus week’s NWN reports that MP Laura Farris (who expressed a number of concerns about the 2,500-home plan in Thatcham at a recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council) has told the most recent meeting of Thatcham Town Council she is in “an ongoing conversation [with WBC] about whether [north east Thatcham] is really the right location.” She has also questioned whether  it’s “Thatcham or nothing” and whether this number of homes are indeed required in the district. On the last point, WBC’s planners will doubtless point to the figures that have been handed down from Whitehall. As to whether Thatcham is the only site in the district, for the reasons I suggested last week, I don’t see that its necessary, beneficial or even feasible to have everything concentrated in a mega-site at all.

• On 8 March, Councillor Hilary Cole (portfolio holder for planning) and Bryan Lyttle (Planning Policy Manager) held a Facebook Live update on the proposed West Berkshire Local Plan Review with a particular focus on the North East Thatcham Strategic Site Allocation. You can see a recording of the event here.

• You might also want to click here to read what the main interested parties have to say about the proposed plans in for 2,500 homes in Thatcham.

• The long-running saga of Piggy Woods (which last year was revealed to be owned but by West Berkshire Council but by an investment company which has since been busy parcelling the land up and selling it at auction) has recently taken a step forward. I learned this week that a number of tree preservation orders arranged by Thatcham Town Council are now in force and should provide a powerful and permanent protection against the risk of speculative development.

• The most recent meeting of Midgham Parish Council took place on 22 March and you can read the minutes here. items covered included: salt bins; Covid scams; an update on the Village Hall; financial matters; one planning application; the PC’s response to the proposed 2,500-home development in Thatcham; delays to the footpath repairs; the co-option of a new councillor; and confirmation that the 2021 Annual Parish Meeting will take place on 25 May in the Village Hall.

• The most recent meeting of Cold Ash Parish Council took place on 9 March and you can read the minutes here.

• Information about the progress of Cold Ash’s neighbourhood development plan can be found here.

• The most recent meeting of Brimpton Parish Council took place on 2 March and you can read the draft minutes here.

• The most recent meeting of Hermitage Parish Council took place on 18 February and you can read the minutes here. Items covered included: various planning applications; financial matters; playground inspections; and the progress of various repairs around the parish.

• See also this page for up-to-date information about Hermitage’s neighbourhood development plan.

• The most recent meeting of Bucklebury Parish Council took place on 8 February and you can read the minutes here.

• The most recent of Stanford Dingley Parish Councillor for which minutes are available took place on 18 January and you can read the draft minutes here.

• Click here to see the latest Cold Ash Community Bulletin, which this week starts with daffodils and ends with Hemingway.

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